Goals for the Neighborhood

Goals for the Neighborhood

Improve the Region's Jobs-Housing Balance and Income Diversity

There are two main goals that southern California, the Inland Empire, and our neighborhood, specifically, must reach in order to fix our economy and to make it sustainable over the long term. The first goal involves the fact that southern California has a major imbalance between the location of jobs and that of housing. The coastal counties suffer from a lack of housing, especially affordable residences, and the Inland ...more »

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Goals for the Neighborhood

Encourage Investment / Reinvestment and Discourage Disinvestment

A broad goal for owners and tenants of residential, retail, and office properties in Arrowhead is to encourage investment in the neighborhood through new construction and through better occupancy of existing buildings and to encourage reinvestment through improvements that are made to existing real estate. Disinvestment leads to declining rents and property values, which, over time, concentrate poverty, increase vacancies, ...more »

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Promote the Creation and Use of Front Porches

Front porches, balconies, and forecourts, as well as dining terraces and similar outdoor rooms that front public streets, not only allow homeowners to make better use of front and side yards. These spaces also promote a safer and more neighborly community by enhancing visibility and by increasing the opportunities for people to casually interact with each other.

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Plant More Street Trees

Street trees in the public right-of-way are important for a host of reasons, and a citizen can add them him- or herself by contacting the City Arborist here in order to learn the appropriate species and to obtain permission: http://user.govoutreach.com/sanbernardino/faq.php?cid=6296 Planting trees is beneficial for a host of reasons, but the benefits are maximized when the trees are planted in rows along streets. ...more »

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Institute More Traffic-Calming Measures

Traffic calming (reducing the design speed of thoroughfares) is among the most beneficial improvements that can be made to the built environment of any city since they: reduce noise pollution: increase property values and business activity; and, enhance safety and walkability. Roadways must be narrowed. Lanes need to be removed. And, more space should be given to pedestrians and cyclists and to street trees. Easy and ...more »

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Make Eliminating Air Pollution a Local and Regional Priority

No other livability problem is more intractable than the local air pollution, which is still among the worst in the nation and which threatens increasing as the population continues to grow. The Inland Empire is caught between being the residence of choice for white-collar workers and being a less-than-desirable home for blue-collar workers who mostly rely on polluting industries. Fixing the economy ultimately depends ...more »

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Increase the Specificity of Ordinances Related to Aesthetics

Courts have routinely held aesthetics to be a legitimate government interest. For example, recently, attendees to Community Builders meetings have expressed grievances related to a neighborhood commercial building that applied bright orange paint to the exterior surfaces visible to the public rights of way. The Municipal Code may be modified to prevent such potential examples of visual pollution and to, in turn, preserve ...more »

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Mitigate Unexpected Noise

Noise pollution is not just detrimental because of loudness or of other intrinsic characteristics the sound possesses. Researchers have found that the degree to which the sound is expected by the listener affects his or her level of stress and his or her tolerance of the noise. So, planners should be taking this fact into consideration when determining what aural pollution is and how it can best be minimized or eliminated ...more »

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